Chuli
Chuli
Chuli
Chuli
Chuli
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Chuli
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Chuli
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Chuli
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Chuli
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Chuli

Chuli

Regular price
0
Sale price
0
Regular price
0
Sold out
Unit price
per 
Chuli - This is how you say apricots in Balti language, a Tibetic language spoken by the Balti people in the Baltistan region of Gilgit-Baltistan, Pakistan.

Our new piece Chuli, is inspired by apricot trees πŸ‘ of Gilgit Baltistan which are grown in abundance πŸƒ 🍁 - in every home and every village. This piece is an ode to the stories and traces of the path of foods from obscurity, fascination and then to familiarity.

The apricot, cultivated in China and Central Asia as early as 2000 B.C., migrated with the country's traders, who traveled the Great Silk Road. Gilgit Baltistan is the main apricot growing regions in Pakistan

Ancient records state that the Hunzas, who inhabited the Himalayan Mountains in the Northern regions of present-day Pakistan and were acknowledged for their vigour and long-life span, cultivated and treasured apricot for its aptitude to foster health for more than 1500 years.

Halmand, Wahphochuli, Lonakpochuli, Sherakarpochuli Shakhanda, Margulam, Karpochuli, Ambah, Staachuli, Khochuli and Brochuli are the variety of apricots grown in Gilgit Baltistan.

19th century English naturalist Canon Henry Baker Tristram wrote, "The great apricot-trees were laden and bent down under strings of ripe, golden fruit. The lanes were strewn with apricots. Asses, mules, and camels in long strings carried heaped panniers of these 'golden apples.'
Tax included.